Injury & Old Age

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Injury & Old Age

Postby MAX RIVAS » Sat Jul 13, 2013 5:21 pm

I've been at San Soo for a few months. I was in relatively good shape...10 real solid years of Yoga...biking, hiking. I'm a 62 year old carpenter. My body is real important to my livelihood. Here recently, I was working out with a green belt. He's at least a couple of hundred or more pounds. We went thru a lesson where after the punch sequence you sweep the man off his feet with your arm. He fell into me, causing the knee to pronate excessively towards the inside...the knee buckled. Ouchies. It's been close to month. It's feeling better...but, I've lost work (which is a major blow) and I haven't able to work-out at anything. And I have no idea what the long term effects of this injury are going to be. It's made me question the initial exhilaration I felt when I started. I'm re-evaluating everything...mostly whether I should go back at all at my age. I need some input. I love San Soo. But, I have to question myself and everyone here whether it's practical for a 62 year old to be putting the most important thing in my life...my health...at risk??? I haven't been at it long enough to know how common injuries are in this pursuit. I don't think any academy is going to be real forthcoming on this. But, I have to presume that an art that is not even considered a sport and is about maiming or worse, that there has to be some injury in practice. I've been going thru all types of stuff in my head dealing with this. I think not having anyone from the studio call me afterwards was disappointing...after all the supposed camaraderie. I remember the reaction when it happened...EVERYBODY looked scared. I instantly became the guy everybody didn't want to be. My friends who frowned from the get-go are giving me the "look". Which means "we didn't say anything but, we knew this was going to happen". It's like I survived all the fights and troubles I had when I was young, managing to stay alive and not sustaining permanent injury--just to have my assed kicked learning self-defense...pretty ironic and ridiculous. Not to sugar coat, I've had many injuries in my other activities...just not as devastating...or thought provoking. I joined this forum because I need advice...I don't know what to do.
MAX RIVAS
 
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Re: Injury & Old Age

Postby Ron G » Sat Jul 13, 2013 10:44 pm

Max,
I am older than you and have been in San Soo for many years (since 1962) you will not believe the violence we went through in the beginning, you are on dangerous ground when you workout. Injuries at our age can last a long time, you will have special needs, I would not have put someone out on the floor (your age) without careful guidance, I am just talking about how I operated but I don't know the facts of your case. You have to understand that even in good shape, you must take control so you do not get hurt and always be on guard to protect your self. Wear protective gear including elbow and knee pads, use your hands as barriers, tell them to slow down or refuse to work with reckless partners. If you still wish to learn try an instructor who stresses much control and offers semi private lessons. There are many people who always want to prove themselves on the workout floor every week, avoid them.
If you still want to learn but not San Soo, try Tai Chi (since you have been doing Yoga) should be a snap since you already understand breath but find an instructor who knows how to use it for combat, who does push/sticking hands (only when your knee heals), you can start movement before if it does not cause pain.
Hope this helps, contact me if you have more questions.
Ron Gatewood
Ron G
 
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Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2013 3:20 pm

Re: Injury & Old Age

Postby MAX RIVAS » Tue Jul 16, 2013 10:55 pm

Ron...first off, thanks very much for your honesty.
I wish I had had this type of dialogue with my instructor when I started. There was NO conversation of this type. (It was ALL positive and upbeat). Though in my own mind it seemed logical that in a practice of this type there had to be dangers. I started up in El Paso, Tx. The academy here is run by Master Paul Shroder....http://www.elpasosansoo.com/ . I did not, however, begin at his main studio on the Eastside but, rather at a secondary (and relatively new), location on the Westside...run by one of his prize black belts...https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kung-Fu- ... 3103725249.

As far as I can see...all adult male/female beginners...are put on the floor almost immediately.
There isn't much warm-up except falling drills and standard to extreme calisthenics for 10 minutes or so. I'm thinking warm-up, careful analysis of the many ways I can avoid trees falling on me...and stronger legs? Lol. I mostly need to do (what?) to avoid this again? A more vigilant instructor...?

It is with no small amount of apprehension and a circumspect attitude, that I release this information. As I understand this is also a community. (Do I really want to make foes of these folks(?)...or anybody...lol). All I know is that I'm abysmally ignorant and I'm trying to rectify the fact.
Knowledge IS power...

Are you Master Ron Gatewood? (Wow...!). You mentioned that the violence at the beginning was extreme. Would you care to enlighten me as to how it was...at El Monte(?)...and how you were able to survive. Was my error in not training with a Master???

Do you know of any other San Soo instructors in my area...I'm also in Las Cruces, NM.???

The feeling I'm having is that I may have received some very optimistic outlooks when the brutal truth might have been the better part of what I got instead. The Westside studio (65) doesn't have the numbers that the Eastside studio (1,500) has... I don't see any real negligence...perhaps a lack of due diligence attributable to the abundant enthusiasm...and optimism...of the young. My instructor is a young, tremendously strong...and ambitious about the studio and the art.

Even know...I find myself repeating and repeating the movement in my head. What went wrong? (It's like the trials and tribulations of the Kung Fu Octogenarian...). Even know I'm making plans to return. (Well, maybe not...). I'm surprised at how much I liked San Soo. The proof being, I'm sitting here this evening typing this... I want to go back. Jesus. No fool like and old fool...

Thanks for everything. Believe me...I'm more educated...because of your reply.
MAX RIVAS
 
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Re: Injury & Old Age

Postby Ron G » Wed Jul 17, 2013 1:08 am

Max,
I know of one school in New Mexico (if it is Ish), I have had issues with him. You can read about it on the Truth Telling portion of this site under "Disrespect", he calls us "Vatos" who he does not respect, make up your own mind.
If you go back, talk to your instructor, tell him your concerns, ask if you could work out a plan, tell him that because of you age you would rather work at a slower pace to prevent injuries, you may work it out but worst case you could leave. What ever don't quit learning, just because you can't bang with the young guys you can learn to fight. It may look slower but if you learn as a smart older person you can learn to move anyone if you create superior balance, if you learn Chi Na (leverages) you can put hurt on anyone.
What is more important to you, permanently injuring you body thumping you opn. for a fight you may never have (especially at you age) or learn to defend yourself, build you health and balance creating a healthier life.
Just my thoughts
PS I started in 1962, turned 73 years old today, older than dirt!
Ron G
 
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Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2013 3:20 pm

Re: Injury & Old Age

Postby Ron G » Wed Jul 17, 2013 2:30 am

Max,
I forgot to tell you, you know more about fighting than you know. I have found in life everything is related, for every action there is reaction but few understand or know how to use it. As an old time carpenter you understand construction, angles, pressures, how to move loads with little effort. What angle do you pull a nail, pound a hammer, how and where to brake a board with your foot. Apply those things to striking, kicking, develop the perfect angle to break an arm. It is all there, figure out how to convert and use it.
Ron G
 
Posts: 301
Joined: Sat Mar 23, 2013 3:20 pm


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